Thursday, April 06, 2006

Embrace Nuclear Power to protect the ecosystem

"When top predators such as wolves and eagles return to a damaged habitat, it is a sure sign that the ecosystem is once again healthy and vibrant.
For several years, ecologists have reported many sightings of rare species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone which are hardly ever seen in other parts of Europe"
Source

See - the best way to protect your environment is to completely screw it up first!  Chernobyl looks set to be the best wildlife reserve in Europe - mainly because no one is going to be contesting its 'park' status or looking for building rights any time soon...


5 comments:

Eko Prasetyo said...

interesting. is this nuclear thingy the way nature messes with mankind's mind to cleanse itself??

burt said...

I'd love to know how many new species have been found ? Scary, two headed wolves !

But if you put aside our big scary blinkers about radiation you could easily conclude that a radiation overdose would ultimately be no worse for life (globally) than any other disaster that has become earth throughout it's long and battered history as a lump of rock flying around a big ball of fire.

You might therefor also conclude that a second accident of the same magnitude in the same place would kill less overall than it did the first time.

Irradiate now, your great grand children will thank you for it !

burt said...

An enterprising person would establish Chernobyl villas holiday resort offering boutique low intensity stays in a rejuvenating unique wildlife environment.

Mathias said...

That is really a sad fact isn't it? :(

iiq374 said...

So far the only "enduring" mutations that have been found has been a lowering in most species fertility.

While there has been other instances of more dramatic mutations (like the famous albino sparrows recently after the event) these just simply do not find mates and have not continued past the generation in which they occur. It is a curious side point to ask if they DID continue due to a marked advantage over the 'original' species - would that be a bad thing?

But ultimately it is pretty sad that irridiating an entire area is better for it ecologically than allowing human habitation...